Day two seminar timings – 28th November 2019

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Crop Protection

Crop Nutrition

Crop Breeding

Crop Establishment

Skip to:

Crop Protection

Crop Nutrition

Crop Breeding

Crop Establishment

Crop Establishment

9.30am – 10.40am

Sponsored by HORSCH UK

Session Chair: Will Gemmill, National Head of Farming and Eastern Regional Chairman, Strutt & Parker 

Profiting from tough decisions: Making every hectare count

Following the suspension of Parliament, the Agriculture Bill of 2018 which sets to phase out direct payments over the next nine years, will have to begin its passage through Parliament again. That delay may be welcome, but its sentiments remain. Namely, the proposal to link any future support to improvements in soil health, air and water quality, alongside other measures to help reduce the impact of climate change.The question for farmers is how should they challenge, manage and adapt to those vague proposals? For many could mean some tough decisions, as our experienced farmer explains.

Speaker: Andrew Pitts, Northants farmer and consultant

Rooting for profit provided by cover crops

Cover crops have an important role to play in maintaining healthy soils – any farm’s most important asset. Here’s a look at the latest findings and recommendations from Cranfield’s BBSRC-funded project which considers the impact of different cover crop rooting systems on various soil properties including structure, porosity and nutrient availability. Trials this season will look at a range of species best suited to reduce soil resource losses and enhancing crop growth.

Speaker: Sarah De Baets, Lecturer Plant-soil Systems, Cranfield University

Crop establishment – it pays to be precise

Precision drilling of cereals using variable seed rates, based on soil type and previous yield data, can improve crop yield and quality; optimise seed utilisation and boost profitability on every suitable hectare. There are a number of systems available, but what might fit the bill for your farm systems?

Speaker: Matt Ward, Agronomist and  Services Leader, Advisory and Agronomy business, Farmacy

10.40am – 11.30am | Break

Crop Establishment

9.30am – 10.40am

Sponsored by HORSCH UK

Session Chair: Will Gemmill, Chairman, Regional Executive and Head of Farming, Strutt & Parker 

Profiting from tough decisions: Making every hectare count

The Agricultural Bill of 2018 sets out to phase out direct payments over the next nine years. It proposes to link any future support to improvements in soil health, air and water quality, alongside other measures to help reduce the impact of climate change. The challenge for farmers is how they should manage and adapt to those, as yet, vague proposals. For many could mean some tough decisions as our experience farmer explains.

Speaker: Andrew Pitts, Northants farmer and consultant

Rooting for profit provided by cover crops

Cover crops have an important role to play in maintaining healthy soils – any farm’s most important asset. Here’s a look at the latest findings and recommendations from Cranfield’s BBSRC-funded project which considers the impact of different cover crop rooting systems on various soil properties including structure, porosity and nutrient availability. Trials this season will look at a range of species best suited to reduce soil resource losses and enhancing crop growth.

Speaker: Sarah De Baets, Lecturer Plant-soil Systems, Cranfield University

Crop establishment – it pays to be precise

Precision drilling of cereals using variable seed rates, based on soil type and previous yield data, can improve crop yield and quality; optimise seed utilisation and boost profitability on every suitable hectare. There are a number of systems available, but what might fit the bill for your farm systems?

Speaker: Matt Ward, Agronomist and  Services Leader, Advisory and Agronomy business, Farmacy

10.40am – 11.30am | Break

Crop Nutrition

11.30am – 12.40pm

Sponsored by YARA UK

Session Chair:  Mark Tucker, Business Development and Head of Agronomy, Yara UK

Implications of the Clean Air Act

An overview of the GHG intensity of cropping and the importance of Nitrogen fertilizer. The need for the industry to work together using benchmarking to encourage best practice and the value of agronomics to demonstrate the benefits and prevent on-farm penalties.

Speaker: Daniel Kindred, Head of Agronomics, ADAS 

Evidence-based approach to crop nutrition

Building on new evidence based on grain bench marking (some of which was supplied by delegates attending last year’s CropTec) and the work of the Yield Enhancement Network, here’s the detail of a new approach to nutrient application to minimise losses while maximising profitability in the process.

Speaker: Natalie Wood, Arable Agronomist for UK and Ireland, Yara UK

Navigating the right course for quality water and profit

What is a realistic target for nitrogen use efficiency to realise optimum yield and profitability while minimising leaching? Here are some solutions, including the uses of nitrogen loss inhibitors, to help you select the optimum application rates for your farm in order to achieve both targets.

Speaker: Keith Goulding, Sustainable Soils Research Fellow, Rothamsted Research

12.40pm – 1.30pm | Break

Crop Nutrition

11.30am – 12.40pm

Sponsored by YARA UK

Session Chair:  Mark Tucker,  Agronomy and Business Development Manager, Yara UK

Implications of the Clean Air Act

An overview of the GHG intensity of cropping and the importance of Nitrogen fertilizer. The need for the industry to work together using benchmarking to encourage best practice and the value of agronomics to demonstrate the benefits and prevent on-farm penalties.

Speaker: Daniel Kindred, Head of Agronomics, ADAS 

Evidence-based approach to crop nutrition

Building on new evidence based on grain bench marking (some of which was supplied by delegates attending last year’s CropTec) and the work of the Yield Enhancement Network, here’s the detail of a new approach to nutrient application to minimise losses while maximising profitability in the process.

Speaker: Natalie Wood, Arable Agronomist for UK and Ireland, Yara UK

Navigating the right course for quality water and profit

What is a realistic target for nitrogen use efficiency to realise optimum yield and profitability while minimising leaching? Here are some solutions, including the uses of nitrogen loss inhibitors, to help you select the optimum application rates for your farm in order to achieve both targets.

Speaker: Keith Goulding, Sustainable Soils Research Fellow, Rothamsted Research

12.40pm – 1.30pm | Break

Crop Breeding

1.30pm – 2.40pm

Sponsored by BASF

Session Chair: Russell McKenzie, Cambridgeshire farmer and AHDB Cereals & Oilseeds Board member

Winning ways with wheat lies in its genes

The Wheat Genetic Improvement Network is a rolling BBSRC project, funded by DEFRA. Its research on a range of traits is designed to reduce those all important unit costs of production while offering environmental benefits. Yield would be more sustainable and profitability enhanced through improved crop resistance to pests and disease, drought resistance and nitrogen use efficiency.

Speaker: Kim Hammond-Kosack, Research Leader Wheat Pathogenomics and Deputy Head, Department of Biointeractions and Crop Protection, Rothamsted Research 

Breeding resilience into oilseed rape

How research is helping plant breeders to take the risk out of growing winter oilseed rape by selecting traits to produce varieties which are resilient to pests, such as cabbage stem flea beetle, and weather variation. Here’s why the effect of temperature and rainfall is so important for seedling establishment along with winter chilling for spring vigour and canopy development.

Speaker: Steven Penfield, Group Leader Genes in the Environment, John Innes Centre

Variety selection in uncertain times

Given the uncertainty surrounding future trading conditions created by Brexit and the talk of trade wars, it will pay dividends to consider the markets for your combinable crops. With an ever increasing list of quality and compliance demand coming from domestic and overseas consumers, what could your business do better to ensure you remain “best in class” for the future? Who better than to ask than the market specialist from the British farmer-owned co-operative which is one of the UK’s leading grain exporters.

Speaker: Cecilia Pryce, Head of Compliance, Research and Shipping, Openfield 

2.40pm – 3.15pm | Break

Crop Breeding

1.30pm – 2.40pm

Sponsored by BASF

Session Chair: Russell McKenzie, Cambridgeshire farmer and AHDB Cereals & Oilseeds Board member

Winning ways with wheat lies in its genes

The Wheat Genetic Improvement Network is a rolling BBSRC project, funded by DEFRA. Its research on a range of traits is designed to reduce those all important unit costs of production while offering environmental benefits. Yield would be more sustainable and profitability enhanced through improved crop resistance to pests and disease, drought resistance and nitrogen use efficiency.

Speaker: Kim Hammond-Kosack, Research Leader Wheat Pathogenomics and Deputy Head, Department of Biointeractions and Crop Protection, Rothamsted Research 

Breeding resilience into oilseed rape

How research is helping plant breeders to take the risk out of growing winter oilseed rape by selecting traits to produce varieties which are resilient to pests, such as cabbage stem flea beetle, and weather variation. Here’s why the effect of temperature and rainfall is so important for seedling establishment along with winter chilling for spring vigour and canopy development.

Speaker: Steven Penfield, Group Leader Genes in the Environment, John Innes Centre

Variety selection in uncertain times

Given the uncertainty surrounding future trading conditions created by Brexit and the talk of trade wars, it will pay dividends to consider the markets for your combinable crops. With an ever increasing list of quality and compliance demand coming from domestic and overseas consumers, what could your business do better to ensure you remain “best in class” for the future? Who better than to ask than the market specialist from the British farmer-owned co-operative which is one of the UK’s leading grain exporters.

Speaker: Cecilia Pryce, Head of Compliance, Research and Shipping, Openfield 

2.40pm – 3.15pm | Break

Crop Protection

3.20pm – 4.30pm

Sponsored by NUFARM

Session Chair: Emma Hamer, senior plant health adviser, NFU

Managing with fewer pesticides

Losses of valuable agrochemicals, such the highly effective fungicide chlorothalonill, have a severe impact on disease control, resistance management and profitability across a range of arable crops. Here’s a look at the combined effect of  growing disease resistance and stricter regulatory issues.

Speaker: Fiona Burnett, head of Connect for Impact, Scotland’s Rural College Knowledge and Innovation Hub and chair of the Fungicide Resistance Group

Profiting from early disease detection

Early crop disease detection, using drone and satellite technology, would be of great benefit to farmers and the countryside. It could save costs, improve quality yield, boost profitability and strengthen environmental safeguards. Here’s an agronomist’s perspective on the principles behind this innovation and the future technology required to realise its full potential..

Speaker: Matt Kettlewell, agronomist, Hummingbird Technologies

Keeping up with changing herbicide dynamics

Broad- leaved weed dynamics are shifting: Cultivation practices and timing, climate change, the loss of actives and herbicide resistance have all contributed to the challenge of broad-leaved weed control in arable crops. Here are some solutions for preventing that problem from building up and protecting your profits.

Speaker: Sarah Cook, weed scientist and senior research consultant, ADAS, Boxworth

4.30pm | End of show

Crop Protection

3.20pm – 4.30pm

Sponsored by NUFARM

Session Chair: Emma Hamer, senior plant health adviser, NFU

Managing with fewer pesticides

Losses of valuable agrochemicals, such the highly effective fungicide chlorothalonill, have a severe impact on disease control, resistance management and profitability across a range of arable crops. Here’s a look at the combined effect of  growing disease resistance and stricter regulatory issues.

Speaker: Fiona Burnett, head of Connect for Impact, Scotland’s Rural College Knowledge and Innovation Hub and chair of the Fungicide Resistance Group

Profiting from early disease detection

Early crop disease detection, using drone and satellite technology, would be of great benefit to farmers and the countryside. It could save costs, improve quality yield, boost profitability and strengthen environmental safeguards. Here’s an agronomist’s perspective on the principles behind this innovation and the future technology required to realise its full potential..

Speaker: Matt Kettlewell, agronomist, Hummingbird

Keeping up with changing herbicide dynamics

Broad- leaved weed dynamics are shifting: Cultivation practices and timing, climate change, the loss of actives and herbicide resistance have all contributed to the challenge of broad-leaved weed control in arable crops. Here are some solutions for preventing that problem from building up and protecting your profits.

Speaker: Sarah Cook, weed scientist and senior research consultant, ADAS, Boxworth

4.30pm | End of show

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